ARS UNA

Connecting Arts, Religion, Sciences - Alternative Philosophy of Development

  A modern Middle Way in Institutions and  Private Life  (in English and German)

The distribution of wealth in Germany
is the most important task of the next generation.

The paralyzing fever over a renewed grand coalition not wanted by the voters finally failed to haggle over seats, while the probably big thematic issues remained the more important the more difficult and more difficult they were to pack.  
Photo R.Habeck M.Schwesig Kevin Kühnert ((own montage)  
 
The most important issue from the point of view of a modern Middle Way, the ever-increasing gap in the distribution of wealth between rich and poor, hardly appeared in the negotiations. It had already become very clear in the analysis of the Landtag election of North Rhine-Westphalia, which had been massively lost by the SPD (social democrats), that this was the point which most worried the largest number of voters.
Obviously, there is a need for a generational change, which according to the ideas represented on ARS-UNA always means a discontinuous development. It seems highly gratifying that the Young Socialists under Kevin Kuehnert are placing these supposedly unsolvable problems at the top of the issues, which of course other countries and other parties are facing too, especially the Greens under the newly elected Robert Habeck.
In both cases there is a personal reference to these two politicians as author of this page. The own mother bore the birth name Kuehnert. Her father came from Wittenberge and soothed together with Noske after the First World War, the impending sailor uprising in Kiel. Her grandfather was instrumental in the construction of the historic Elbe Bridge Wittenberge as an engineer, while other parts of the family came from Torgau. Robert Habeck, on the other hand, is a minister in the state government in the own hometown Kiel and, as a writer and philosopher, as well as in his politics, he has similar positions to the own ones. Manuela Schwesig from Frakfurt/Oder or now Schwerin would not be a bad choice in their alliance. All three, however, put thematic arguments ahead of the questions of the distribution of seats.  

© Copyright Hans J. Unsoeld, Berlin 2018  
Updated Feb. 10, 2018